Sessions: Friday, April 25th

Arbor Day is chock-full of intriguing sessions. Here’s a quick overview of what’s going on:

8:30-10:00AM Concurrent Sessions

  1. Finding Harmony: Pathways for Access to Oral History Collections. Concerned about opening your oral history holdings to researchers? Come hear what Sarah Milligan (Kentucky Historical Society/Kentucky Oral History Commission) and panelists Doug Boyd (University of Kentucky), Sarah-Jane Poindexter (University of Louisville), and Anne Ryckbost (Northern Kentucky University) have determined to be the important aspects of providing access to oral history collections within the boundaries of the law and ethical standards as collection professionals. Bringing together the institutional and risk management understanding of managers and the intimate collection knowledge of employees can result in greater access to legacy collections.
    [Mission Room, Ballroom (3rd) Floor, Westin at Crown Center]
  2. Hangin’ with the Cool Cats: Enhancing Archives Access through Digital Humanities. What’s the connection between Digital Humanities and Archives? Let Virginia Connell (Concordia College) and panelists Ellen Engseth (University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee Libraries), John Faundeen (US Geological Survey), Matt Herbison (Drexel University College of Medicine), Joy K. Lintelman (Concordia College), and Lisa Sjoberg, (Concordia College) give you some insight into how you: establish archivist and faculty collaborations to integrate digital humanities projects into courses, use aerial imagery and topographic maps for geolocation of archival materials, build a local history encyclopedia as a digital history project and participate in a new campus digital humanities lab, and develop an online system that extends an existing digital collections website into something more student-friendly.
    [Century Ballroom A, Ballroom (3rd) Floor, Westin at Crown Center]
  3. The Tribal Libraries, Archives, and Museums Project: Bringing LIS Students and American Indian Communities Together to Learn through Sharing and Community. Come and learn about the TLAM Project and how its seeks to engage with underrepresented areas of our field and develop mutually beneficial relationships with tribal cultural heritage professionals. Mary Wise (University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Library and Information Studies) and panelists Omar Poler (University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Library and Information Studies), Sara Summers-Luedtke (Oneida Nation Museum), and Lotus Norton-Wisla (University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Library and Information Studies) will share the TLAM model in order to encourage practicing professionals and educators to consider ways of engaging with tribal partners.
    [Shawnee Room, Ballroom (3rd) Floor, Westin at Crown Center]

10:30AM-12:00PM Concurrent Sessions

  1. Becoming a Suzuki-Approved Repository: Training Archival Students. Shinichi Suzuki extended native language acquisition to learning to play the violin. The same underlying idea that an environment can be used to aid learning and by extension training future archivists will be explored by Tom Steman (St. Cloud State University) and panelists Katie Blank (Marquette University), Alexis Braun Marks (Eastern Michigan University) and Rachel Vagts (Berea College). Topics include practical experience and how it correlates to job placement, whether small shops benefit by offering meaningful student work experiences, and how a union environment has defined the roles of personnel who staff the archives and its impact on recruiting interns and the assignment of projects.
    [Shawnee Room, Ballroom (3rd) Floor, Westin at Crown Center]
  2. Digital Preservation at the Crossroads. Preserving and managing digital collections does not often have a one-size-fits-all solution. Erik Moore (University of Minnesota) and panelists Aaron Collie (Michigan State University), Ben Goldman (Penn State University), Benn Joseph (Northwestern University), and Mike Shallcross (University of Michigan) will relate experiences planning and implementing digital preservation solutions in unique environments. Come and learn what has worked, what hasn’t, and how the practices of each institution continue to evolve.
    [Mission Room, Ballroom (3rd) Floor, Westin at Crown Center]
  3. Part Theory, Part Therapy: Archival Management Lessons from the Trenches. A lightning round format will allow Cliff Hight (Kansas State University) and eight panelists — Stephanie Bennett (Iowa State University), Ruth E. Bryan (University of Kentucky), Gary Cox (University of Missouri), Tamar Chute (The Ohio State University), Sammie Morris (Purdue University), Trista Raezer (North Dakota State University), Adonna Thompson (Avila University), Anke Voss, (The Urbana Free Library) — to address numerous topics regarding archival management. Lots of experience and tips on everything from workflows to task assignments, working with different personalities to challenges of higher education archives, donor relations to student assistants, and digitization to allowing the archivist time to think, research, and write!
    [Century Ballroom A, Ballroom (3rd) Floor, Westin at Crown Center]

1:30PM-3:00PM Concurrent Sessions

  1. Creative Solutions: Oral History on a Budget. Making the ends meet of an oral history project can be a challenge. Listen to Deborah Dandridge (University of Kansas) and panelists Rob DeLand (VanderCook College of Music), Jeremy Feador (Baldwin Wallace University), Kevin Grace (University of Cincinnati), and Judith A. Wiener (The Ohio State University Health Sciences Library) as they share tips on utilizing resources and technology in a cost-effective and budget-friendly manner. The oral history projects under discussion include the Navy V-12, nursing, urban studies, folklore, and the preservation of audio cassettes from a 1970s master’s thesis.
    [Mission Room, Ballroom (3rd) Floor, Westin at Crown Center]
  2. Crossed Swords at the Crossroads: The MAC 2014 Debates. Join moderator Daria Labinsky (National Archives at St. Louis), and debaters Timothy Achee (Saint Louis University), Shannon M. Erb (University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee), Jennifer A. Head (Sisters of Charity of the Blessed Virgin Mary), Katherine Burger Johnson (University of Louisville), Christopher O. Magee (National Archives at Kansas City), and Samantha Smith (Loyola University at Chicago) as they lay out arguments on two controversial archival topics: 1) that archivists have a professional responsibility to be politically active and 2) that the  cost of using volunteers in archival institutions outweighs the benefits. I’m sure we all have our opinions on these two topics. Now come and see how a formal, “modified Oxford-style” debate will add new perspectives to your views!
    [Century Ballroom A, Ballroom (3rd) Floor, Westin at Crown Center]
  3. Managing the Syncopations of Socially Connected Collections. In the always new, always attention-grabbing world of social media, three questions resonate loudly in the world of archives, libraries, and musems: 1) How do we seek out and integrate collaborators across departments or institutions? 2) How do we effectively craft a clear identity with so many competing interests? and 3) How do we communicate our goals and expectations as we expand to a team of content creators? Come hear Janet Carleton (Ohio University) and panelists Robert Garrett (Archives of Michigan), Sasha Griffin (Luther College), and Colleen Theisen (University of Iowa) relate their success with social media management in government, college, and university collections and how they manage to maintain a clear voice with multiple partners and content creators.
    [Shawnee Room, Ballroom (3rd) Floor, Westin at Crown Center]

More information is available in the conference program (pdf) or at mac2014.sched.org

Advertisements